Rondina Huma

Hopi
Rondina Huma
Polychrome pot by Rondina Huma
 

A member of the Tewa Kachina/Parrot Clan, Rondina Huma was born in Keams Canyon, Arizona and has lived in the village of Polacca most of her life. As she was not born into one of the well-known Hopi-Tewa pottery families, she is a self-taught potter who got into clay only at the urging of a neighbor. From that point on she studied the age-old techniques and methods, learning everything she could so she could begin to reproduce some of the fantastic designs she was finding on the ground while walking around the nearby ruins of Sikyatki. Once she had the process down, she refined her production steps and concentrated on her painting. Today she is best known for her very intricate work reproducing hundreds of small square Sikyatki designs across the surfaces of her pottery.

She has been one of the most in-demand Hopi-Tewa potters for many years now. She has been featured in many publications and her work is represented in major galleries and museums throughout the country. Over the years Rondina has earned ribbons from the prestigious SWAIA Santa Fe Indian Market. In 1986 one of her pieces was awarded Best of Show, Best of Division and Best of Traditional Pottery. In 1996 another of her pieces swept all three awards again. Her work is easily recognized for her intricate designs that incorporate hundreds of small elements. Her polish is exceptional and her painting remarkable. Unlike most potters, she usually polishes the insides of her pots, too.

Her pottery is traditional in every manner - she does the full Hopi process using nothing but native materials, even down to fashioning her paint brushes from the leaves of the yucca plant. She hand coils all her vessels and uses only vegetal and mineral paints. She also does traditional ground firing.

She signs her pottery "Rondina Huma Tewa-Hopi", and adds her clan symbol, a parrot.


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