Black bowl with corrugated design made by Lucy Year Flower of Pojoaque
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Lucy Year Flower, Pojoaque, Black bowl with corrugated design
Lucy Year Flower
Pojoaque
$ SOLD
cjsc2k072
Black bowl with corrugated design
3.5 in L by 3.5 in W by 2.75 in H
Condition: Very good
Signature: Lucy Yearflower Pojoaque Pue.
Date Created: 1974


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Every box is required. We will get back to you as soon as possible. Thank you!

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Pojoaque Pueblo

The Poeh Culture Center in Pojoaque
Poeh Culture Center at Pojoaque

The Pojoaque Pueblo area was first settled around 500 AD and the population grew until it peaked in the 1500's. That was about the same time the Spanish first arrived. The first Franciscan mission was built at the pueblo in the early 1600's but the people were already hurting under the impact of Spanish taxes, forced labor and continuous efforts to force conversion to Christianity. That all added up to Pojoaque being in the forefront of the Pueblo Revolt of 1680. Immediately following the revolt, Pojoaque was abandoned and wasn't resettled until about 1706 when many Pojoaque's trickled back from the Cuartelejo area on the plains of west Kansas. By then the major Spanish retributions had died down and it was relatively safe to return, surrender and pledge allegiance anew. Franciscans were also being replaced with Jesuits and the religious fervor receded from the heights reached during the Inquisition.

The population of the reestablished pueblo grew slowly but they saw increasing problems from non-Indian encroachment until President Abraham Lincoln recognized the pueblo as an official tribe. Some documents say he awarded the tribe with an official land grant in 1864 and gave a silver cane to the tribe's governor. Other documents say the tribe was given a quit-claim deed... However it worked out, the tribe did gain some legal standing and was able to reestablish its presence until 1900 when a severe smallpox epidemic caused the pueblo to be abandoned again (the Cacique (the tribe's religious leader) died and Governor Jose Antonio Tapia left the reservation to find work).

In 1934 the Commissioner of Indian Affairs placed newspaper ads around the area calling for all Pojoaque tribal members to come back and reoccupy the pueblo lands or tribal ownership would be dissolved under the Indian Re-Organization Act. Shortly, 14 members of the Villareal, Tapia, Romero and Gutierrez/Montoya families were awarded land grants from the Pueblo land base. By 1936 tribal enrollment reached 263 members and Pojoaque became a Federally recognized Indian Reservation.

During the time of abandonment, many Pojoaque tribe members moved to nearby Santa Clara and San Juan Pueblos. Those Pojoaque who were making pottery at the time learned new things from their neighbors and when they later returned to Pojoaque, traditional pottery making changed with all the cross-pollination of styles and designs. Some potters, though, returned to making only traditional Pojoaque styles and designs. Today there is hardly any pottery being made at Pojoaque as so many tribal members are employed in one or another of the tribe's many commercial enterprises.

Map showing the location of Pojoaque Pueblo

For more info:
at Wikipedia
official website


Corrugated Pottery

White jar with handles and a corrugated surface

Jessie Garcia
Acoma
Corrugated white jar with handles

Stella Shutiva
Acoma
White corrugated jar with handles

Jackie Shutiva
Acoma

Corrugated pottery is made by coiling a pot but instead of smoothing the coils on the outside like most other pots, a finger or tool is used to make regular indentations in the coils. Corrugation often covers an entire piece but is also sometimes used in bands to decorate pots in a manner other than painting, carving or etching.

The corrugated pottery pattern was revived by Jessie Garcia after she came across corrugated potsherds lying on the ground near her home at Acoma. They were left over from the work of unknown potters hundreds of years ago.

A corrugated cooking jar offers more surface area to a fire: it heats up faster and the heat distribution is more even. As a design pattern she felt she could make uniquely her own, Jessie spent years perfecting it. Then she taught her daughter, Stella Shutiva, how to make it and Stella perfected it further. Stella even traveled to the Smithsonian Institute in Washington DC in 1973 to demonstrate how she made her corrugated wares. Then Stella taught her daughter, Jackie Shutiva, how to do it. Today, Jackie is the premier producer of corrugated pottery at Acoma, and she, too, has developed her own styles and forms.

Margaret Tafoya Family Tree

Disclaimer: This "family tree" is a best effort on our part to determine who the potters are in this family and arrange them in a generational order. The general information available is questionable so we have tried to show each of these diagrams to living members of each family to get their input and approval, too. This diagram is subject to change should we get better info.

Note: Sarafina (Gutierrez) Tafoya was the sister of Pasqualita Tani Gutierrez.

    Sarafina Tafoya (1863-1949) & Geronimo Tafoya
    • Margaret Tafoya (1904-2001) & Alcario Tafoya (d. 1995)
      • Mary Ester Archuleta (1942-2010)
        • Barry Archuleta
        • Bryon Archuleta
        • Sheila Archuleta
      • Jennie Trammel (1929-2010)
        • Karen Trammel Beloris
      • Virginia Ebelacker (1925-2001)
        • James Ebelacker (1960-) & Cynthia Ebelacker
          • Jamelyn Ebelacker
          • Sarena Ebelacker
        • Richard Ebelacker (1946-2010) & Yvonne Ortiz
          • Jason Ebelacker
          • Jerome Ebelacker & Dyan Esquibel
            • Andrew Ebelacker
            • Nickolas Ebelacker
      • Lee Tafoya (1926-1996) & Betty Tafoya (Anglo)
        • Linda Tafoya (Oyenque)(Sanchez) (1962-)
          • Antonio Jose Oyenque
          • Jeremy Rio Oyenque
          • Maria Theresa Oyenque
        • Melvin Tafoya
        • Phyllis Bustos Tafoya
      • Mela Youngblood (1931-1990) & Walt Youngblood
        • Nancy Youngblood (1955-)
          • Christopher Cutler
          • Joseph Lugo
          • Sergio Lugo
        • Nathan Youngblood (1954-)
      • Toni Roller (1935-)
        • Brandon Roller
        • Cliff Roller (1961-)
        • Deborah Morning Star Roller
        • Jeff Roller (1963-)
          • Jordan Roller
          • Ryan Roller
        • Susan Roller Whittington (1955-)
          • Charles Lewis
        • Tim Roller (1959-)
        • William Roller
      • LuAnn Tafoya (1938-) & Sostence Tapia
        • Michele Tapia Browning (1960-)
          • Ashley Browning
          • Mindy Browning
        • Daryl Duane Whitegeese (1964-) & Rosemary Hardy
          • Samantha Whitegeese
          • Tina Whitegeese
      • Shirley Cactus Blossom Tafoya (1947-)
      • Meldon Tafoya
        • Andrea Tafoya
        • Crystal Tafoya
        • Melissa Tafoya
    • Christina Naranjo (1891-1980) & Jose Victor Naranjo (1895-1942)
      • Mary Cain (1916-2010)
        • Billy Cain (1950-2005)
        • Joy Cain (1947-)
        • Linda Cain (1949-)
          • Autumn Borts-Medlock (1967-)
          • Tammy Garcia (1969-)
        • Douglas Tafoya
        • Marjorie Tafoya Tanin
      • Teresita Naranjo (1919-1999)
        • Stella Chavarria (1939-)
          • Denise Chavarria (1959-)
          • Joey Chavarria (1964-1987)
          • Sunday Chavarria (1963-)
      • Cecilia Naranjo
        • Sharon Naranjo Garcia (1951-)
        • Judy Tafoya (1962-) & Lincoln Tafoya (1954-)
      • Mida Tafoya (1931-)
        • Sherry Tafoya (1956-)
        • Phyllis & Mathew Tafoya
          • Marlin Hemlock (Seneca) & Phyllis Hemlock
        • Ethel Vigil
          • Kimberly Garcia
    • Camilio Tafoya (1902-1995) & Agapita Silva (1904-1959)
      • Joe Tafoya & Lucy Year Flower (1935-2012)
        • Kelli Little Kachina (1967-2014)
        • Myra Little Snow (1962-)
        • Forrest Red Cloud Tafoya
        • Shawn Tafoya (1968-)
      • Joseph Lonewolf (1932-2014) & Katheryn Lonewolf
        • Greg Lonewolf (1952-)
        • Rosemary Apple Blossom Lonewolf (1954-) & Paul Speckled Rock (1952-2017)
          • Adam Speckled Rock
        • Susan Romero
      • Grace Medicine Flower (1938-)
    • Dolorita Padilla (1897-1960) & Alberto Padilla (1898-)
    • Tomacita Tafoya Naranjo (1884-1918) & Agapita Naranjo
      • Nicolasa Naranjo (c.1910-) & Jose G. Tafoya
        • Howard Naranjo & Linda Naranjo

Some of the above info is drawn from Pueblo Indian Pottery, 750 Artist Biographies, by Gregory Schaaf, © 2000, Center for Indigenous Arts & Studies

Other info is derived from personal contacts with family members and through interminable searches of the Internet.