Red wedding vase with lightly carved geometric design
 made by Caroline Carpio of Isleta
Click or tap to see a larger version

Caroline Carpio, Isleta, Red wedding vase with lightly carved geometric design
Caroline Carpio
Isleta
$ 1300
mdlel9290
Red wedding vase with lightly carved geometric design
10 3/4 in H by 8 1/4 in Dia
Condition: Excellent
Signature: Caroline L. Carpio Isleta Pueblo NM

*
*
*
Best way to contact you:
Email:  Phone: 

Please click the checkbox below to tell the program you are human:

-

Every box is required

We will get back to you as soon as possible. Thank you!

We keep all your information private and will not sell or give it away for any reason, EVER!

*
*
*
Best way to contact you:
Email:  Phone: 
Your billing address:




Please click the checkbox below to tell the program you are human:

  

Every box is required

We will get back to you as soon as possible. Thank you!

We keep all your information private and will not sell or give it away for any reason, EVER!

Tell me more!   Buy this piece!
 

Caroline Carpio

Isleta

Red wedding vase with a lightly carved geometric design
 

The daughter of Sosten Clovis Lucero and Katherine Maria Lucero, Caroline Carpio was born into Isleta Pueblo in October, 1962. After high school she began studying photography at the Institute for American Indian Arts in Santa Fe but a couple classes in pottery and clay arts captured her attention. She found a new path in three-dimensional art and moved more into making traditional pottery, graduating from the University of New Mexico with Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 1996.

Caroline has been making pottery for more than 30 years now. For almost 20 years she has also been producing bronze sculptures based on her pottery shapes and designs.

Some of the honors and awards she has earned over the years:

  • 1st place, Mescalero Arts & Crafts Show, Mescalero, NM, 1984
  • Best of Show, Colorado Indian Market, Denver, CO, 1986
  • 3rd place, Gallup Inter-Tribal Indian Ceremonials, Gallup NM, 1994
  • Best of Show, New Mexico State Fair, Albuquerque, NM, 1995
  • Best of Division, Heard Museum Indian Art Show, Phoenix, AZ, 1997
  • Best of Division, Red Earth Festival, Oklahoma City, OK, 1997
  • Fellowship recipient, Southwest Association for Indian Art, 2000
  • Artist in Residence, Takeo Region International Art & Cultural Exchange Program, Japan, 2001
  • Artist of the Year, Indians Arts & Crafts Association, 2012

Caroline's work is displayed in venues such as the Museum of Arizona, Maxwell Museum of Anthropology and the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian. She makes the whole range of traditional styles and shapes, from melon jars to wedding vases to figurines. Virtually all of her pieces incorporate water depictions such as rain, clouds, cattails and dragonflies. She says she finds her inspiration in the traditions of her people and the beauty of Mother Earth that surrounds her. In her own words: "We all have different ways to pay homage to our Creator for our existence, and my means of paying the honor is to create something beautiful that comes comes from Mother Earth, from which we all came. The representation of my people, and the contemporary expression of who I am is voiced through the creations of my art. It guides us to the past and to the future."

Print this biography

 

Isleta Pueblo

The Isleta Mission
San Agustin de la Isletas Mission

Isleta Pueblo was founded in the 1300's. Archaeologists have put forth various ideas as to where the people came from with some scholars saying they migrated north from Mogollon/Mimbres settlements to the south while others say they migrated southwestward from either Chaco Canyon in the 1100's and 1200's or from the Four Corners area in the 1200's and 1300's. Their Tiwa language is shared with nearby Sandia Pueblo and a very similar tongue is spoken to the north at Taos and Picuris Pueblos. The two dialects are sometimes referred to as Southern and Northern Tiwa.

When the Spanish arrived in the area they named the pueblo "Isleta" (meaning: island). The residents were relatively accommodating to the Spanish priests when compared to the reception the same priests got in other areas of Nuevo Mexico (making Isleta something of an "island of safety" for the Spanish in an ocean of hostility). When the Pueblo Revolt of 1680 happened, Isleta either couldn't or wouldn't participate in the rebellion. When the Spanish governor left Santa Fe he went to Isleta and gathered his troops. None wanted to go back and fight so when they left and headed south, many Isletans went south to the El Paso area with them. Others fled to the Hopi settlements in Arizona and returned after the fighting was clearly over, many with Hopi spouses. When the Spanish returned in 1682 they found the Isleta mission church burned and the main structure was being used as a livestock pen. When the Spanish returned in force in 1692 they found Isleta empty and burned. The governor ordered the pueblo be rebuilt and resettled so residents were brought in from Taos and Picuris to the north and from Ysleta del Sur to the south, near El Paso. By 1720 a new, grander mission had been rebuilt on the foundations of the first.

Over the next century dissident members of the Laguna and Acoma Pueblo communities migrated to Isleta. While they were welcomed into the main Isleta pueblo at first, friction developed over the years until in the 1800's, the small communities of Oraibi and Chicale were established and most of the newcomers moved to one or the other.

The advent of the railroad in New Mexico was almost the end of the Isleta community as so many of the men went to work for the railroad. While the remaining residents managed to hold on to some of their social and religious practices, other elements of their culture almost disappeared, pottery making being one of those traditions that barely survived.

Today, making pottery the traditional way is practiced by only a few potters and their close family members.

Location of Isleta Pueblo

For more info:
at Wikipedia
official website

Print this Pueblo Information

The Story of
the Wedding Vase

as told by Teresita Naranjo of Santa Clara Pueblo

Wedding vase by Helen Naha

Helen Naha
Hopi
Red wedding vase with sgraffito geometric design

Wilma Baca Tosa
Jemez Pueblo
Avanyu design carved into a black wedding vase

Margaret Tafoya
Santa Clara Pueblo

The Wedding Vase has been used for a long, long time in Indian Wedding Ceremonies.

After a period of courtship, when a boy and girl decide to get married, they cannot do so until certain customs have been observed. The boy must first call all his relatives together to tell them that he desires to be married to a certain girl. If the relatives agree, two or three of the oldest men are chosen to call on the parents of the girl. They pray according to Indian custom and the oldest man will tell the parents of the girl what their purpose is in visiting. The girl’s parents never give a definite answer at this time, but just say that they will let the boy’s family know their decision later.

About a week later, the girl calls a meeting of her relatives. The family then decides what answer should be given. If the answer is “no” that is the end of it. If the answer is “yes” then the oldest men in her family are delegated to go to the boy’s home, and to give the answer, and to tell the boy on what day he can come to receive his bride-to-be. The boy must also notify all of his relatives on what day the girl will receive him, so that they will be able to have gifts for the girl.

Now the boy must find a Godmother and Godfather. The Godmother immediately starts making the wedding vase so that it will be finished by the time the girl is to be received. The Godmother also takes some of the stones which have been designated as holy and dips them into water, to make it holy water. It is with this holy water that the vase is filled on the day of the reception.

The reception day finally comes and the Godmother and Godfather lead the procession of the boy’s relatives to the home of the girl. The groom is the last in line and must stand at the door of the bride’s home until the gifts his relatives have brought have been opened and received by the bride.

The bride and groom now kneel in the middle of the room with the groom’s relatives and the bride’s parents praying all around them. The bride then gives her squash blossom necklace to the groom’s oldest male relative, while the groom gives his necklace to the bride’s oldest male relative. After each man has prayed, the groom’s necklace is placed on the bride, and the bride’s is likewise placed on the groom.

After the exchange of squash blossom necklaces and prayers, the Godmother places the wedding vase in front of the bride and groom. The bride drinks out of one side of the wedding vase and the groom drinks from the other. Then, the vase is passed to all in the room, with the women all drinking from the bride’s side, and the men from the groom’s.

After the ritual drinking of the holy water and the prayers, the bride’s family feeds all the groom’s relatives and a date is set for the church wedding. The wedding vase is now put aside until after the church wedding.

Once the church wedding ceremony has occurred, the wedding vase is filled with any drink the family may wish. Once again, all the family drinks in the traditional manner, with women drinking from one side, and men the other. Having served its ceremonial purpose, the wedding vase is given to the young newlyweds as a good luck piece.

Print this Style Information