Nativity set with 17 pieces New Arrival this month
, Click or tap to see a larger version
See a larger version

Stella Teller, Isleta , Nativity set with 17 pieces New Arrival this month
Artist: Stella Teller
Pueblo: Isleta
Dimensions: 5 in H by 5 3/4 in Dia Measurement of largest dimensions
Item Number: xxlel7314
Price: $ 2600
Description: Nativity set with 17 pieces New Arrival this month
Condition: Very Good
Signature: Stella Teller Isleta , N.M.

*
*
*
Best way to contact you:
Email:  Phone: 

Please click the checkbox below to tell the program you're human:

-

Every box is required

We will get back to you as soon as possible. Thank you!

We keep all your information private and will not sell or give it away for any reason, EVER!

 
 

Stella Teller

Isleta
Five cubs on a bear storyteller figure, made by Isleta Pueblo potter Stella Teller
 

The daughter of Rudy and Felicita Jojola, Stella Teller was born at Isleta Pueblo in 1929. It wasn't until about 1962 that she first appeared in the marketplace with her earliest pieces. Since then she has earned numerous awards at the SWAIA Santa Fe Indian Market, the Eight Northern Pueblos Arts and Crafts Show and the New Mexico State Fair for her distinctive storytellers, nativities and non-traditional jars (canteens in particular).

Stella's pieces are notable for their "sleeping eyes," overall light-blue to white coloring and often have strings of heishi beads either inlaid or painted on. Some of her pieces have found their way into the collections of the Peabody Museum at Harvard College in Boston, the Folk Museum in Berlin, Germany, and into the Wright Collection, Walton-Anderson Collection and the personal collections of Frank Kinsel and Peter B. Carl.

Her favorite designs include clouds, rain, turtles, Pueblo dancers and kiva steps. Her favorite styles include storytellers, Nativities, jars, bowls, wedding vases, canteens and effigies.

Stella has passed her knowledge on to her daughters: Chris, Mona, Robin and Lynette, each of whom has gone on to become award-winning potters in their own right.


Print this biography (.pdf)

Teller Family Tree

Disclaimer: This "family tree" is a best effort on our part to determine who the potters are in this family and arrange them in a generational order. The general information available is questionable so we have tried to show each of these diagrams to living members of each family to get their input and approval, too. This diagram is subject to change should we get better info.


    Stella (b. 1929) and Louis Teller
    Their descendants who became potters:
    • Chris Teller Lucero (b. 1956)
    • Marie (Robin) Teller Velardez (b. 1954) and Ray Velardez
      Their descendants who became potters:
      • Lesley Teller Velardez (b. 1973)
    • Mona Blythe Teller (b. 1960)
      Her daughter who became a potter:
      • Nicol Teller Blythe (1978)
    • Lynette Teller (b. 1963)

Pottery Care & Consideration

  • The most obvious tip: Yes, the pots will break if you drop them!
  • Do not expose pottery to water (Inside or outside). Do not wipe with a damp cloth.
  • Dust pottery only with a soft, smooth cloth (no terry cloth or textured fabric). A very soft paintbrush (sable or camel) can be used.
  • Always use two hands to carry your pot: one on top and one on the bottom, or one hand on each side. Be careful with handles, they can be fragile. Do not grip or lift pots by the rim. Take care when wearing jewelry, rings can scratch the finish.
  • Place a piece of felt or cloth between the pot and the shelf to protect the signature.
  • Avoid exposing pottery to extreme temperature changes.

For those who live in "earthquake country" (also good for mischievous pets):

  • Weigh pots down with a small zip lock bag containing sand, glass marbles, rice, etc. Do not fill the pot more than one third full as you want them bottom heavy. Remember to remove the weight before moving.
  • Secure your shelves; make sure they are well attached to the walls. Shelf brackets should be of sufficient length and strength to support the weight of your pottery.
  • Prevent pots from sliding. Consider attaching a small wooden molding to the front of shelves. Line shelves with non-slip material (a thin sheet of rubber foam, Styrofoam sheeting, etc.)
  • If you need assistance with special problems, major cleaning (your grandchild spills ice cream on your pot), restoration or repair (the cat breaks a pot), or replacement (irreparable damage), please feel free to call us.

We hope these ideas help you maintain the beauty and value of your pottery for years of enjoyment.

Print this page (.pdf)